What are the main differences in CV style from country to country

 

 

 

 

If you’re going for a job in any country you will have to hand in a CV providing details of your previous work history, contact details and information about your educational qualifications. However, there are certain things you must include on your CV if you’re in a different country. This week we tell you what the main difference are in CVs styles across Europe.

When Applying For A Job In France

France

Differences in Style and Formatting

• Check if British or American spelling is preferred on an English CV. Employers often have a preference.

Skills and Experience To Highlight

• List the languages you speak and identify your level of proficiency (bilingual, fluent, conversational or basic).

• In France educational terms are not necessarily universally recognised – explain them.

Other Things To Keep In Mind

• Give the recruiter a sense of your interests outside of what is purely work-related.

• Cultural knowledge is highly valued in France.

For information check out:

• See for a sample CV: http://french.about.com/library/writing/bl-cv3.htm

When Applying For A Job In Spain

Spain

Differences in Style and Formatting

• Full name & title, address, phone number, email address, age or date of birth need to be included on a CV.

• Section is optional.

• Add a high-quality photo to the CV.

Skills and Experience To Highlight

• You can add the type of driver’s license held, civil (marital) status.

• List applicable courses (formación técnica – technical training) or formación profesional (professional training).

• Include study abroad experience, employers are interested to know.

• Include trainee periods, summer & part-time work & internships.

• List languages. Speaking Spanish is important to work in Spain.
So be sure to state your fluency levels (speaking, writing and reading).

• Name certificates and/or language test results.

• It’s not common to give references, so don’t worry about this.

Other Things To Keep In Mind

See for a sample CV: http://www.donquijote.org/jobs/cv/

When Applying For A Job In Italy

Italy

Differences in Style and Formatting

• Pictures are not normally included.
• End your CVs with this statement: Autorizzo il trattamento dei miei dati personali ai sensi del D.L. 196/2003. (I agree to disclose my personal information according to the law 196/2003.)

Skills and Experience To Highlight

• Specify the level of fluency, comprehension, writing and speaking ability on your CV.
• Refer to an officially-recognised proficiency examination, language diploma or a course. This is so that Italian employers know you are reputable. The CILS exam (Certificazione di Italiano come Lingua Straniera) is an examination to prove competence in Italian.

Other Things To Keep In Mind

See for a sample CV: http://en.bab.la/phrases/application/resume-cv/english-italian/

When Applying For A Job In Germany

Germany

Differences in Style and Formatting
• Full name, postal address, telephone number (add your country code), email address, date and place of birth, marital status. All of these details must be included.
• In German the CV is known as a lebenslauf in German.
• In Germany your lebenslauf (CV). Should be no more than two pages.
• Photograph: high-quality and professional glued to the upper right corner of the first page of CV. German employers want to see a picture of you before the interview.
• Include the name, dates, location and business focus of the employer for each position.

Skills and Experience To Highlight
• State your language skills with levels for speaking, reading and writing.
• Knowledge of computer languages and programmes is considered impressive.
• Briefly mention your hobbies.

Other Things To Keep In Mind
See for a sample CV and more tips: http://www.welcometogermerica.com/2014/10/how-to-write-german-lebenslauf.html

When Applying For A Job In Netherlands

Netherlands

Differences in Style and Formatting

• State your objective / what you’re seeking.

Skills and Experience To Highlight
• It is important to include a lot of education details such as: the dates of study, certificate received, core modules, study abroad experience, thesis title.
• Professional associations (organisations, interest groups).

Other Things To Keep In Mind

See for a sample CV and more tips: http://blogs.transparent.com/dutch/how-to-write-a-dutch-cv/
http://www.iamexpat.nl/career/guides-tools/cv-guide

When Applying For A Job In Belgium

Belgium

Differences in Style and Formatting

• Don’t include salary expectations in your CV.
• Full name and title, address, phone number(s), mail address, date. & Place of birth, citizenship, marital status & number of children.
Skills and Experience To Highlight
• Areas of concentration, special courses, seminars, internships, non-degree & foreign studies.
• There are differences between applying for job in Brussels, the Flemish and Walloon regions.

Other Things To Keep In Mind
See for a sample CV and more tips: http://inforjeunesbruxelles.be/jobs-etudiants/le-cv/modeles-de-cv
http://resume.modelocurriculum.net/the-cv-in-belgium.html

When Applying For A Job In Austria

austria


Differences in Style and Formatting

• 2 pages.
• Include a professional photograph.
• Sign your CV at the bottom.

Skills and Experience To Highlight
• Additional training.
• Military experience.
• There shouldn’t be any unexplained gaps.

Other Things To Keep In Mind
See for a sample CV and more tips: http://resume.modelocurriculum.net/the-cv-in-austria.html

Transform your CV into a USA ready Resume

 

 

 

 

 

Have you ever thought about doing a J1 in the US? Perhaps you’re looking for a job, internship, or to further your education in the States? If so, you’ll need to make some small changes to your CV before applying. First off it’s important to know that a CV  is called a resume in the US. Employers and universities will be reviewing your resume with a few different expectations in relation to format and content.

Follow these tips to transform your current CV into a US ready resume:

  • Do not go over 1 page. The rule of thumb is one page per degree, so if you have a masters you can fill 2 pages, doctorate 3+ pages. Exception: if you have 10+ years of full-time professional experience you can also use a second page.
  • Use Letter paper size (21.59 x 27.94 cm) when writing your resume so that it will fit appropriately when it’s printed in the US.
  • Do not put a picture on your resume. You will be screened out or your resume placed in the rubbish bin because pictures create potential for discrimination claims.
  • Do not include secondary school information. Only include pre-university activities if they are relevant to the job (in a Clubs and Organizations section).
  • Do not include an Interests and Hobbies section. In the US, employers do not expect to see social activities included on a resume. If an interest or hobby is related to the job, consider adding it in a Clubs & Organizations or Skills section or to your cover letter.
  • Do not write ‘references available upon request’. This is assumed and since space is limited it’s considered a waste to write what is already known.
  • Watch your words and convert spelling to American English when relevant, i.e. program/programme, organize/organise, centre/center.

Once you’ve assembled a resume, come visit us at the Career Development Centre. You can drop into a CV/Application workshop or schedule a 20 minute Quick Query meeting with a Career & Skills Consultant who can review the resume and/or application with you.